TOS: Season 2, Episodes 4 and 5 (Jan 14, 2020)

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Series and Season: Star Trek: The Original Series, Season 2

Episode #, and Episode Name: 4 – “Mirror, Mirror” and 5 – “The Apple”

Setting the Stage: I started at 8:00 pm on January 14th, 2020 with the husband and pupper, mostly because husband requested to watch this one with me because “it’s important”. I watched the second while working out, but it was a long day and I’m exhausted, so only two episodes today. I’m still watching via Netflix and using their episode order.

As a point of order, a dear friend of mine (and Trek fan since birth) pointed out that the Season 2 credits did change a bit… they now list Kelley in the credits. I totally missed that in my last post, my bad Bones!

Quick Summary with my Impressions: “Mirror, Mirror” starts off with four of the crew being sent to the Mirror Universe. It’s interesting that I’ve seen so many versions of it, but now I get to see the original. Spock is sporting a beard, everyone has funky outfits, and apparently corporal punishment is a thing on the Mirror Enterprise. Kirk seems to jump to the correct conclusion quite quickly and this is not the first time that’s happened. The leap in logic is a little much for me. They really are laying the Nazi stuff on thick this episode, like we didn’t already know this universe was supposed to be the “bad” one. Oh Sulu that’s not a good look on you, and I’m not talking about the scar but instead his intentions toward Uhura. Chekov is an ambitious little Slytherin in this episode, but gets owned. In our Enterprise, Spock knows what’s up and imprisons the Mirror landing party. Back on the other ship, Kirk is SHOCKED to find a woman in his bed. Mirror Spock has been ordered to kill Kirk, and Uhura is the biggest badass on the ship when she has it out with Mirror Sulu. Cue the big fight scene, where the Mirror Spock stunt guy totally sticks out like a sore thumb. Mirror Kirk’s lady love takes out most of Mirror Sulu’s men, and the landing party heads to the transporter room where the parties swap back to their respective universes.

from myconfinedspace.com

I enjoyed this episode as it was the tried and true “good vs. evil” episode, before it was tried and true. I do like Spock better with a beard, and I hate that I agree with McCoy on something. It was fun to see the crew have to act as themselves part of the time, and their “evil” half the other part. I give this episode 9 gold stars and a pat on the head.

In “The Apple” I find that Chekov reminds me of the dad in My Big Fat Greek Wedding, but instead of everything being Greek, it’s Russian. Oh no, more killer flowers! Didn’t we do this already? Spock finds a rock and throws it out, only to blow up some part of the path ahead. Scotty is having a problem with the Enterprise, but it’s because of something on the surface of the planet. Why are we having issues with the transporter again? Spock is hit with the same killer flower after pushing Kirk out of the way, and the two men have a very interesting exchange. Wait, now there is killer lightening, what the hell is going on? Kirk is showing uncharacteristic regret about staying on the planet because it cost the lives of three of his men. He’s starting to display the pressure of command. By far the funniest line of the episode is “I wont hurt you”, which is said after Kirk just punched the guy, sigh. We meet the strange villagers who do not understand a lot of concepts and are another set of miracles mysteries to McCoy. I still don’t understand why they thought Spock’s name was so funny. Oh no, not another machine controlling the planet! The machine, Vaal, gets upset when two of the villagers begin to kiss and orders his minions to kill the landing party because they are too dangerous. Kirk seems to be struggling with the impending doom of the Enterprise and its crew, but then has an idea (just in the nick of time) when Vaal wants to be fed. Kirk destroys the machine, “frees” the village, and the Enterprise is back to usual. McCoy and Spock argue scripture a bit, and they make a really awful joke about Spock looking like Satan.

from sheknows.com

I wasn’t a fan of the dialogue in this episode. Chekov was a total horn dog, the humor between Kirk and Scotty just didn’t land right, and there was a lot of heteronormativity (I know, I know, it’s the 60s). I did like the story line and was glad that Kirk destroyed the machine with phaser beams instead of talking to it until it explodes. I give this episode 4 and three-quarter milkshakes.

TOS: Season 2, Episodes 1 – 3 (Jan 13, 2020)

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Series and Season: Star Trek: The Original Series, Season 2

Episode #, and Episode Name: 1 – “Amok Time”, 2 – “Who Mourns for Adonais?”, and 3 – “The Changeling”

Setting the Stage: I started at 7:30 pm on January 13, 2020. Still watching via Netflix and using their viewing order. Husband and I ate dinner while we watched the first two episodes. I worked out during the last episode. Professor Zoom has decided he likes this Star Trek stuff and was present for all three episodes. As this was a new season, I watched the introduction on the first episode. Spoiler alert: it hasn’t changed.

I’ve also updated how I’ll run these posts with my Summary and Impressions all mixed together. I’m also going to try to do better on rating each episode, but they will be inconsistent just for funsies.

Quick Summary with my Impressions: “Amok Time” begins with a volatile and very emotional Spock. Oh my goodness, it’s babyface Walter Koenig and he’s in an AWFUL wig. McCoy is trying to be chummy with Spock instead of antagonistic, I like that. Spock is deeply uncomfortable and apparently he’s going to die if he doesn’t get laid. I really like the Sulu and Chekov dynamic, I hope to see more of it as the season progresses. Wait, is Spock hitting on Chapel?! Okay, so we get to the planet Vulcan and Spock calls Kirk and McCoy his closest friends, in the most Vulcan way possible, and it’s super adorable.

Spock and his lady “love” exchange very Vulcan pleasantries and the three men beam down to begin the ceremony. There is so much dramatic music, Kirk and McCoy are clearly confused, and apparently his “wife” decides she wants Spock to fight for her. She chooses Kirk instead of the random dude with a green sash who she apparently made an earlier agreement with. Okay, what is with the damn bells? This is going to be interesting, there are axes… oh, and combat is to the death, whoops. Had to show off Kirk’s chest, really? Watching the stuntmen go at it is kind of funny, because it’s very clear when Shatner and Nimoy are not the ones fighting . McCoy helps even things out for Kirk when a time out is called. Now, there are lasso-like belts and Spock is totally winning… he seems to come to his senses when it looks like he’s killed Kirk. Methinks McCoy gave him something to appear dead, calling Romeo and Juliet. Spock’s bride-to-be did want the other dude and Spock gladly parts with her, praising her logic. I hear “live long and prosper” for the first time! When Spock turns around to see Kirk is alive and he smiles, it’s the best scene ever. We end on a high note and some sassy commentary between our three leading men. I absolutely loved this episode, 10/10 would recommend.

from huffingtonpost.co.uk

“Who Mourns for Adonais?” opens with Scotty is pulling the moves, McCoy being misogynistic, and Kirk lamenting about a future where he would lose an officer when they see a green puff of smoke in the shape of a hand that grabs the ship. There’s a dude on the screen but Kirk thinks he’s the boss and tries to puff his chest out at iot. Spock is not allowed on the planet because he’s a killjoy, according to the mysterious man. At least this time the man, Apollo, is in a skimpy outfit. I’m noticing more that they definitely do something to make all the women be seen in a softer light. Apollo is in thrall with Carolyn and Scotty ain’t having that… but it’s no use, she likes her pretty pink outfit. Let’s be honest, I like it too and that would be awesome to cosplay in the damn Atlanta heat. What’s with Kirk getting choked out two episodes in a row? Uhura will not be rushed with her repairs and Spock is kind in turn, understanding the situation. Carolyn smashes Apollo’s heart in the best way possible, she’s cold as ice, and then he goes apeshit while the Enterprise tries to smash his structure. Apollo starts crying and begs the other gods to take him home. This episode was okay, I give it 5 avocados.

from tor.com

“The Changeling” opens with a problem, where did the 4 billion people go? More weird green objects coming at the ship, what is this Disney villain hour?  Spock essentially says good things come in small packages, yay for me at 5 foot tall. A machine beams aboard and NOMAD reminds me of Brainiac from Superman. Nope, apparently it’s Ultron and has to exterminate anything that isn’t perfect. NOMAD is all about Uhura’s voice, but then doesn’t understand the concept of music and wipes Uhura’s brains. Man, Scotty keeps getting owned… WHAT THE FUCK, Scotty is dead? Uhura is stoned? What is happening? OF COURSE I WANT YOU TO REPAIR THE UNIT, is what Kirk should have said.  Also I love that they are using floppy disks, not sure I made the connection before. NOMAD “repairs” Scotty, whew, but Uhura has to relearn everything. This makes for an adorable moment between Uhura and Chapel. Spock wants to do some Vulcan mind magic, that almost breaks him, so in turn Kirk breaks the mind of NOMAD with a logic error. Man, the redshirts are getting OWNED this episode. Kirk continues to probe at NOMAD until it breaks down. Spock and Kirk take NOMAD back to the transporter room a la Batman ( https://vimeo.com/91815457 ) and they transport it off the ship just in time for it to explode. Uhura is smart as hell, she relearns quite quickly, and I’m sure will be back to her usual in no time. “My son, the doctor” is one of my new favorite lines from Kirk. I really liked the dialogue in this episode, so it’s a solid 7 or 8 from me even though we see Kirk out-logicing a robot, again.

fromsyfy.com

January 12, 2020: The End of Season 1 (29 – 30)

Series: Star Trek: The Original Series

SeasonEpisode #,and Episode Name: Season 1, Episode 29, “The City on the Edge of Forever” and Episode 30, “Operation: Annihilate!”

Setting the Stage: I started at 5:00 pm on January 12, 2020, still watching via Netflix, so I’m using their viewing order. I had a special request from the husband that he be present to watch the first episode, but after that he disappeared. Thor and Professor Zoom were around, but Zoom was tuckered out. He had way too much birthday yesterday. He would, however, love to know if you think he’s the best pupper… so you should leave a comment on his birthday post.

Quick Summary with my reactions: “The City on the Edge of Forever” opens with Sulu’s panel exploding and McCoy having to do some dangerous medicine. The ship rocks and McCoy accidentally injects himself, goes crazy, and beams himself down to the planet (that’s having some weird time stuff). I love seeing Uhura in the landing party, glad to see her getting out and stretching her legs. The party finds a weird structure that begins talking and showing them Earth’s history, when McCoy suddenly jumps in, and the Enterprise vanishes because McCoy has changed time! Spock and Kirk jump into time a little ahead of where McCoy might be, they land in the 1930s, and Kirk falls in love. Turns out, Kirk’s lady love needs to die in order for history to go back to the way it was. Watching Kirk make the choice to not save a woman he is in love with is one of the saddest things I have watched. Not as sad as that scene in John Wick, but it’s up there.

from pedestrian.tv

“Operation: Annihilate!” is the season finale and it doesn’t disappoint with the drama of some ship making a beeline for the sun of that system and being excited about being “free”. The landing party finds Kirk’s brother dead, but his nephew and sister-in-law have survived the strange creatures that seem to have taken over the people of the system. While investigating, Spock gets attacked by a creature and is incapacitated until he can lean on his Vulcan side to avoid the pain. McCoy blinds Spock in trying to kill the creatures, but we find out that it could have been avoided! As McCoy and Kirk are all despondent, and the creatures on the planet are dying, Spock regains his vision due to Vulcan anatomy magic. A very bittersweet ending to Season 1.

from johnkennethmuir.wordpress.com

My Impressions: “The City on the Edge of Forever” is an episode I have been looking forward to because husband and work mom hyped it up. They were not wrong about it’s awesomeness, mostly because it had to do with time travel and didn’t make my head hurt! They corrected whatever McCoy had done and got back as if no time had passed with presumably nothing changed in their own past. It was quite funny to watch Kirk being absolutely terrible at improv when they ran into the police officer, and so terribly sad when Kirk’s lady love had to die. I also enjoyed watching Spock in total disgust at having to work with such “subprime” tools and materials, but also being able to put together what was needed.

Uhura and Scotty were both fantastic in “Operation: Annihilate!”. Uhura doesn’t take shit from Kirk when he’s being impatient and is able to explain that it just can’t be done. Scotty doesn’t take shit from Spock, even though Spock is his superior officer and gave a direct order. They may not have had many lines, but they were my absolute favorites.

Overall, I thought Season 1 of Star Trek: The Original Series had its ups and downs. There were some episodes that did not age well, did not sit well, and had some real strange choices made. There were other episodes that still ring true today, or were relatable in some way. To see what technology is still science fiction in the 2020s and what things we are maybe decades away from is interesting. I am absolutely “Team Spock”, it’s clearly the logical choice. Tomorrow, I’ll begin Season 2. Here’s to hoping there’s more Sulu and Scotty.

January 10, 2020: 2 Episodes (27 – 28)

Series: Star Trek: The Original Series

SeasonEpisode #,and Episode Name: Season 1, Episode 27, “Errand of Mercy” and Episode 28, “The Alternative Factor”

Setting the Stage: I started at 8:00 pm on January 10, 2020, still watching via Netflix, so I’m using their viewing order. Professor Zoom, Tempura, and Thor were present for both episodes. My husband watched the first episode and then had some other things to do so he left me to the second episode.

I notice when I’ve had a long day at work, or I get a late start, that two episodes is more than enough for me. While I had hoped to get three and three done and thus have finished Season 1 tonight, it didn’t happen. I also am unsure if I’ll be able to watch any Star Trek on Saturday as we’re having a very delayed birthday party for me… so we’ll see if I am able to post tomorrow. I also think I might change the format up a bit for Season 2 and beyond. Is there anything you would like to see?

Quick Summary with my reactions:  “Errand of Mercy” is the first time I have heard the Klingons mentioned. They do not appear physically the same as the Klingons I have seen, my husband assures me I’ll find out why when I watch Enterprise… great. Kirk makes a big deal to Sulu about his duty to the Enterprise and not to Kirk and Spock before the latter two men beam down, only to be trapped on the planet with the strange Organians while the Klingons start their occupation. It’s the Federation versus the Klingon Empire, but wait… the Organians are essentially Vorlons! Okay so yes, Babylon 5 came after Star Trek and it’s the other way around, but since I watched Babylon 5 first and it’s my blog, you’ll just have to live with it. The Organians are opposed to violence and force a truce while Kirk realizes he was arguing for a war he was really against.

from pintrest.com

“The Alternative Factor” opens with two strange pulses that not only emanate throughout the galaxy, but also apparently create life on the planet below. This Lazarus dude is super weird, and we have the first of several ridiculously long fight sequences in a weird white light space. Apparently Lazarus is two people, matter and anti-matter. This reminds me a bit of Michael Korvac from Earth’s Mightiest Heroes, but I don’t really know why I’m just instantly reminded of that particular episode. And now we get to it, Lazarus is a damn time traveler… calling Dr. Who (I have also never watched an episode of Dr. Who, maybe that will be my 2021 project). Is this a Crisis on Infinite Earths type thing? Kirk tries to help make sure that the two Lazaruses do not meet so as to avoid all of life exploding… so he traps the two men in the warp area and the Enterprise moves on to its next adventure.

from themoviedb.org

My Impressions: In “Errand of Mercy” I find it interesting how we again hear Kirk telling whoever he is leaving in charge that the duty is to the ship and not the landing party. Kirk completely understands how many people are under his command and he is unwilling to risk the lives of every person on board in order to save him or anyone else who goes to investigate their latest problem. It’s a theme I’ve noticed over the course of several episodes and it’s really highlighted here in the discussion between Sulu and Kirk. It’c clear everyone loves the Captain and would do anything for him, but his responsibility is so much larger. Also in full effect this episode is the “Shatner comma” with the speech pattern that he is best known for. The Klingons in this episode all look like they stepped out of Afghanistan and not an alien planet, or at least not the Klingons I am most familiar with. The only one who looks different is the leader, but I guess that was the point?

In “The Alternative Factor” Spock calls Lazarus a liar in the best way ever, and I’m still laughing about the exchange. I had also almost all but forgotten about McCoy, who wasn’t in the previous episode, until he was called on to care for Lazarus. He’s not really my favorite character, but he does give some good sassy dialogue. he ridiculously long fight sequences just seemed to fill up time and the pacing of this episode is SO SLOW. Kirk talks about leaping, and I’m instantly reminded that my husband needs to watch all of Quantum Leap with me, but I digress. Hopefully I’ll be back tomorrow or Sunday with the last two episodes of Season 1!

from quantumleap.fandom.com